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Posts Tagged ‘Vegetables’

From the Midtown Messenger:

PET-V’s release pointed to the seminal example of the late anthropologist Carlos Castaneda, whose training as a Yaqui Indian medicine man included not only talking to plants, but constantly apologizing to them, especially to the female specimens of dioecious, or sexually differentiated, varieties. Shortly prior to his death a decade ago, Castaneda said plants, including fresh salads, had finally begun talking back to him, and that while–unlike erstwhile comedian and noted amateur early childhood development specialist Steve Martin, he does not “speak baby talk”–he could detect especially heart-rending sighs and plaintive-sounding whispers when consuming underage salad ingredients, especially chervil.

Ha!

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Yes, I know I’m flagrantly biting Pizappas’ schtick, but I’d like to take a moment to discuss a new, fulfilling relationship I have in my life. I’ve fallen deeply in love with the Park Slope CSA. It nurtures my body with crazy, fresh, organic produce I would never be able to afford otherwise and it nurtures my soul with fruity politics and community spirit.

For those of you who are not familiar, CSA is “Community Supported Agriculture.” Basically, one neighborhood teams up with a farm and buys one season’s worth of produce up front. For the next 5 months or so, the farm carts the produce down to a single location once a week. On the designated pick-up day, all of the neighbors who signed up for a share come get their heap of vegetables or fruit or flowers or eggs or meat or whatever they signed up for.

This is a nice thing because:

1. You eat and learn how to prepare vegetables you’ve never heard of before (i.e. garlic scapes or butter lettuce).

2. It’s cheaper than buying organic or even regular produce at a grocery store and most farmer’s markets. I’m just saying, it’s like $5 for a bunch of asparagus in my grocery store.

3. The farms are committed to organic, sustainable agriculture. So you know the food you’re getting is safe to eat (no e. coli for me!) and is not overly aggressive to the land it’s raised on.

4. It’s an energy efficient method of getting food. All of the food is grown reasonably locally (like 100 miles, as opposed to 4000 miles away). No need for airplanes, boats, etc. Additionally, because it’s delivered to one central neighborhood location, there is no wasted gas for deliveries and most people can walk their food home.

5. It’s good for independent farming because farmers get money when they need it (at the beginning of the season) and have a guaranteed market for their produce.

Okay, that is all I have to say about that. But if you’re interested in finding a CSA, the following Brooklyn neighborhoods have one:

Bed-Stuy
Brooklyn Heights
Carroll Gardens
Clinton Hill/Ft. Greene
Cobble Hill
East New York
East Williamsburg (845-943-8699)
Greenwood Heights
Kensington/Windsor Terrace
Park Slope
Prospect Heights
Prospect/Lefferts Garden
Red Hook
Williamsburg

And if you’re a sucker and you live somewhere else, you can find a CSA by state or ZIP code here.

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My gayness was piqued this week with all the Rufus Wainwright talk and that crazy article in NY Magazine about genetic gaydar and third-sex and all that crap. Sadly, I was out of town during Brooklyn Pride and was not able to get my gay on with my borough brothers and sisters. But no need to worry! This weekend is NYC Pride, which is like the biggest, gayest weekend ever!

Despite my being unpleasantly hetero, I’ve always enjoyed Pride. One year, I got a coupon for a free Chipotle burrito that was thrown from a passing float during the parade. And Harvey Fierstein and the Queer Eyes were there! It was amazing.

So anyway, I’m sure I’ll see you all at XXL NYC, a “rowdy bear party.” Hot!

Bears.

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Sometimes in the course of my work, it is necessary for me to perform searches such as “veggie fun facts” or “cabbage trivia.” Here is a sampling of what Google found for me today:

“In addition, store the urine of anyone who habitually eats cabbage; warm it, bathe the patient in it. With this treatment you will soon restore health; it has been tested…Those who cannot see clearly should bathe their eyes in this urine and they will see more.”
Cato, ‘On Farming’ (234-149 B.C.) translated by Andrew Dalby.

“If kale had a degree, it’d be from Yale.”

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