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Archive for the ‘Drinking Game’ Category

One Sunday matinée of Milk-n-Honey + One Monday night Foundry Theatre Free-Range Thanksgiving = Whoa! Amazing!

Sunday was the final day in the inaugural run of Milk-n-Honey, a multimedia theater piece put on by LightBox at 3-Legged Dog Theater. After interviews with eaters, chefs, pickers, doctors, food scientists, dumpster divers, farmers, and more, they came up with a series of short vignettes following a collection of stories about how food affects all these people.

Two supermarket clerks crushing on each other figure out if going on dumpster diving, urban foraging dates are romantic or gross. After regaining his taste buds from a jellyfish sting, a flavor scientist searches for the elusive flavor of light. A Mexican man takes a new job in America as a picker, trying to make the money to send back to his family while coming to terms with what it means to be living in the United States illegally. A sugar fiend gets diagnosed with diabetes, and tries to learn to navigate the supermarket without going into diabetic shock.

These stories were told in a dynamic, mobile set – supermarket shelves on wheels were whirled around to create evocative spaces. A camera mounted to a supermarket cart added a degree of meta-awareness to a scene unfolding directly in front of you.

An after show cafe featured homemade brownies by the Lower East Side Girls Club and a presentation from NYU students in an Oxfam Chapter about the Farm Bill.

After being an audience-member at Milk-n-Honey, I was thrust into the spotlight at The Foundry Theatre’s fully participatory Free-Range Thanksgiving.

Ten playwrights had been commissioned to write short plays for the event, and each of them, paired with a director, were charged with turning a dinner table of strangers into the stars of the premiere of their new work.

Each table was named for one of the plays, and sitting at “And Only Now Is It As Clear As It Has Ever Been,” I was not sure what was coming for me from award-winning playwright Carl Hancock Rux. What I was sure of was that I should take advantage of the copious amounts of free NYS wine that were provided, and get a little smashed. That was the whole idea of the event! Get everyone smashed and acting. A high school drama geek’s wildest fantasy.

When combined with a surprising and seasonal menu prepared by Chef Eric Hunter with food from Golden Earthworm Organic Farm and Roxbury Farm, and an audience made up of writers, actors, directors, and food activists, it was an exciting and totally original night.

I learned that I like Lily Flower, a pickled-tasted bundle of petals added to the salad varietals and doused with grapefruit-lemon thyme vinaigrette. To describe the savory back-of-tongue feelings from the miso-marinated local greens I drew back on the Milk-n-Honey flavor scientists’ explanation of the way our tongues and noses decipher tastes and memories. The dessert, homemade gingerbread with poached apple-rosemary sauce, was as delicious as it sounded, and possibly even more so at ten minutes to midnight and some number of bottles of wine in, as it was served.

So, congratulations to LightBox and The Foundry Theatre! These were fantastic and innovative events, and completely proactive at involving people from many and varied experiences with food, eating, living, and performing.

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The Brooklyn wino has many choices when it comes to “scoring juice” in the Carroll Gardens area. But of course, we know not all wine shops are created equal. Frankly, the area spanning Court/Atlantic to Smith/9th street is littered with average wine shops (Scotto’s, Carroll Gardens Wine & Liquor, Vintage Cellars, The-Bullet-Proof-Window-Liquor-Store, etc.) that just provide your standard Yellowtail Shiraz meets “I’m Francis Coppola and I’m Buying This Vineyard” selection. These places are fine if you just need a bottle of Jameson and want to shoot the shit with the owner. But hey, let’s get real. This is Brooklyn and I expect a perhaps smallish but exotic and carefully picked assortment of well priced, worldly wines.

And this is what you get at Smith & Vine, the only store in this whole area that has truly sent me out the door murmuring a Cartman-like “sweeeet” with a happy jaunt in my step. You can tell the quality selection here by the lovingly labeled descriptions placed on each bottle coupled with the fact that there isn’t overwhelming amounts of dusty inventory stacked to the ceilings. Plus, the friendly staff always seems to be drinking and that can only be good, right?

S&V’s single best feature is the “10$ and under” table, which is the store’s centerpiece. One side is dedicated to reds and the other side white, with about ten bottles on each side. It’s tough to go wrong here, and I made it my beeswax for a whole year to try out as many as I could. For me, it sealed S&V’s spot as “most kick-ass wine shop in Carroll Gardens.”

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Another advantage of S&V is their sister cheese shop “Stinky” located across the street. These shops are totally in sync, and everyone knows what’s up. This really makes things easy when you’re shopping for Wine & Cheese night. Stinky’s got some great stuff, and also sells crackers, quince paste, cured meats (Christ, they have “guanciale”) and duck confit. Those close to me know I believe ducks to be a superior species.

Smith and Vine
268 Smith Street
(718) 243-2864

Pros:

  • The 10$ and under table is a Brooklyn landmark.
  • Wine selection is given a lot of care and well labeled
  • Great opening hours
  • Sister cheese store across the street
  • Excellent website

Cons:

  • The staff’s a bit jaded, but it might be ‘cause they’re drunk all the time.

You Can’t Go Wrong With: Domaine De La Batardière (white) – a crisp , dry and flavorful Muscadet from the Loire Valley (France, genius), this is the ultimate summer wine and perfect for that romantic picnic in Prospect Park or just a booze-soaked Sunday.

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All this steak talk has inspired me to bring to the table one of the hottest foodie topics right now: the pairing of food with cocktails. Here’s a great drink our resident mixologist has sacrificed an afternoon of work to bring you…the Basil Mojito. (Yes, we merely replaced mint with basil).

Ingredients:

Bacardi Limon (Regular Bottle or Handle)
Basil Leaves
Limes
Club Soda
Sugar

Method:

In a rocks glass, drop in 1 quartered lime, a small handful of fresh basil leaves, and one large tablespoon of granulated sugar. We prefer to do the whole thing in a big punch bowl, in which case you multiply all the ingredients by 10.

With a muddler, or a wooden spoon, muddle (i.e. “smash”) the hell out of the ingredients. The sugar will help macerate the lime and get all the juice out, and result in a nice layer of thick greenish syrup on the bottom. For the glass, fill with with ice and proceed to pour in Bacardi Limon light rum until there is only a half inch left of room left. Mix using a shaker or a pint glass. Top off with a splash of club soda, stick in a straw and enjoy. The straw will stop the basil from getting stuck in your teeth. If using the big punch bowl, just pour in the whole handle of rum and add a 12oz bottle of club soda. Mix.

If you really want to impress , slice a cucumber into thin wheels and use as a garnish on the side of the glass. Make sure you fill your glass with ice before every refill.

Warning: This drink will make your guests VERY sociable, and you’ll truly be damned at just how much quasi-straight liquor you can actually drink. It’s really quite remarkable.

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I am going to have to disagree with your latest post, Recklesley. Peter Petrelli is, in my book, the anti-Emo. I’m not sure which “Heroes” you watch, but in my (Primetime NBC) version, Peter Petrelli does not waste his time writing forlorn lyrics or perfecting his black eyeliner, but rather directs his actions towards, oh, I don’t know, Saving The World, perhaps? Now I realize Peter Petrelli’s duties run parallel to those of Peter Parker’s (interesting…similar names these two), protecting everyday civilians from evil villains, etc, but from what I hear, Peter Parker transforms into an (Emo) tool once he puts on that black outfit-thing (or whatever), more so than he already was. And Petrelli, aside from falling in love with a woman whose heart belongs to a heroin shooting, psychic comic book writing, artist, does not embody any other tell tale signs/symptoms of an Emo d-bag.

Just to reiterate why Peter Parker is, in many ways, a poster-child for Emo boys everywhere, here is a short list of his Emo characteristics:

– Was a nerd in high school.
– Wears dark rimmed glasses.
– (Apparently) morphs into an even bigger Emo-ster once he puts on, surprise, an all black ensemble.

And I’m not even going to attempt to tackle the thousands of reasons why Conor Oberst is the king of all Emo, since you already know them all. I think every time a Bright Eyes song is played, a sad, resentful, greasy haired boy gets his Emo wings. Or cries.

Peter Petrelli, however, does not inherit any of these traits. He is courageous, intuitive, and easy on the eyes. All of which, in my book, are in no way tied in with the Emo stereotype. So let’s not place that dangerous “Emo” label on just anyone who possesses dark features and super hero capabilities (minus Oberst). People’s feelings might get hurt.

PS. You call this Emo?



Note: “Heroes” is the best show on network television right now. Watch it, fools.

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After a long day at the Met game, some of us were just looking for a way to unwind last night. It was quickly decided that we all needed to let our hair down, forget the troubles of the world, and get to some orderly – if excessive – competitive drinking. And so we began the first game of Asshole I’ve played since college. It was a doozy.

In case you are not as painfully familiar with the game as I am, you can look it up for yourself because it is too complicated to explain. It had a lot in common with the Brooklyn Brewery Beer Tasting, in that it involved a lot of beer and a terrifyingly drunk Johnb. It differed only in the amount of swearing, rules and playing cards involved.

About an hour in, the game devolved into some sort of fantasy/role-playing drama as one president reigned over the rest of us. She doled out drinks like other unelected leaders dole out summary executions or questionable intelligence. We curried her favor by slinging praise and adulation at her. We undercut our opponents with cruel moves and mandatory drinking. That’s the thing with this game – it encourages the very worst in its players. Normally generous, gregarious individuals reveal themselves to be sniveling brown-nosers whose only real skill is torturing those who are arbitrarily ranked lower than they are. It’s like Risk with livers.

Pros:

  1. Encourages swearing, drunkenness and other underrated activities.
  2. Less complicated than poker.
  3. Invites discussion of civic infrastructure, economic mobility and democratic principles.
  4. Involves trivia questions from time to time.

Cons:

  1. Brings out the asshole in everyone, so to speak.

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